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Awhile back I was awarded the privilege and opportunity to see a lecture from his honorable Grigor Hovhannison (Ambassador) at the Embassy of Armenia on the country’s current political, cultural, economic, and social climate.

This was an exclusive event attended by fewer than 30 attendees ranging from philanthropic, international, legal, and political backgrounds. Attire was business professional since this networking event was designed as a business social. I wore a turquoise dress from Saks, silver strappy shoes from Nordstroms, and a basic business blazer from The Limited.

armenian embassy sherryn again
Photo by Mike Braaten of PixofDC

Often times by embassy row, parking can be quite a challenge. However, if you park after 5:00 p.m you have a better shot with street parking. I had a long commute so I decided to metro to Dupont Circle and walk close to a mile in the beating sun (this was a Summer event).

At the event, I was greeted warmly by volunteers from The World Affairs Council (they tend to sponsor spectacular embassy events) and had memorable conversation with socialites, embassy staff, and with some movers and shakers. The intimate surrounding made it much easier to learn and mingle.

The Embassy, itself, is housed in a beautiful setting that is multi-leveled, and beset with columns inside the quarters. Sculptures, life size paintings, an antique piano, and a refined bar was a welcoming sight when I walked inside the embassy’s cozy doors.

sherryn power shot armenian embassy
Photo by Mike Braaten of PIXofDC

Before attending this event, I brushed up on basics about the country. Such as cognac being a popular drink of choice and lavash being a popular bread paired with sauces, meat dishes, and soups. Unfortunately, neither the liquor or the bread was available at the event. All was forgiven since Armenian red wine tastes like a liquor from the Gods and the shish kebob, veggie and meat dishes left a delicious after taste with me.

Before I chowed down like a lady, I listened to the ambassadors lecture on how Armenia is faring with the world.  The ambassador is a talented speaker. He was able to punctuate open dialogue on the Armenia’s state of affairs with great humor and verve. For example, he had a riveting  slideshow on famous Armenians.

Naturally, everyone laughed when Kim Kardashian was brought up and I was ecstatic he emphasized that a major bandmate from the 90s rock band System of a Down. The ambassador is way too hip and cool. For those of you who have missed this slideshow, check out this link to learn more about the top 100 Armenians who have changed the world.

His honorable Hovhannison educated the crowd in Armenia’s contributions within the United States and overseas for hundreds of years. Here’s some interesting facts:

1.) Chess is a mandatory course to take in most schools.

2.) Armenia was the first country to have adopted Christianity as its official religion.

3.) Armenia is one of the oldest wine producing countries in the world.

4.) The apricot is a symbol of Armenia.

5.) Cher (YES, the one and only) is Armenian.

I hope to visit the embassy again in the near future. There’s much I would love to learn about the refined culture of Armenia.

 

About World Affairs Council

The World Affairs Councils of America represents and supports the largest national non-partisan network of local councils that are dedicated to educating, inspiring and engaging Americans in international affairs and the critical global issues of our times. The network consists of almost 100 councils in over 40 states. Each non-profit, non-partisan council is autonomous with respect to their governance, financing and programming but share common values. Founded in 1918, it has grown to become the United States’ largest non-profit international affairs organization.

Written by Sherryn Daniel

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Sharing the Details (formerly Sherryn Daniel’s Blog), a comprehensive Gala and red carpet blog that provides the true sparkle with the D.C philanthropic and glamour scene.

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